Rattigan Glumphoboo



As my former professor and friend put it, 

I predict that there will be voices saying: “Well, then DON’T take nude pictures if you don’t want them to be hacked!”

'I also predict that these same voices have their own personal, private information (passwords, tax information, financial records) stored electronically, and would be aghast if someone hacked their files and distributed them over the net.'

posted 11 hours ago

stopitsgingertime:

On how the show will handle some of the novel’s odder moments:

You have to ground it in the emotional reality of what Shadow, or Wednesday, or Laura is experiencing in that moment. One of the exciting things for us in adapting this is that we get to expand characters, so Bilquis, who is only in a chapter of the book, then you don’t see her again, is a major player in this world. Laura, who is kind of lurking in the background, she’s a major player in this world.

On developing the novel’s women characters for television:

One of the things that’s important for anybody adapting source material that is primarily a male buddy picture is to find ways to latch on to strong female characters in the piece and bring them to the forefront and celebrate their point of view alongside the men, otherwise it becomes a sausage party and it’s a singular point of view.

I AM DEAD. I AM DEAD, AND BRYAN FULLER HAS KILLED ME WITH ALL OF HIS CORRECT OPINIONS AND CREATIVE DECISIONS. BILQUIS IS GOING TO BE EXPANDED INTO A MAIN CHARACTER!!!!! ENTIRE EPISODES FROM LAURA’S PERSPECTIVE!!!! I AM NOT BREATHING!!!!



You’ve managed to get them all an even length. 6 inches.

cantankerousquince:

image

image

image

image

And Mel and Sue are right there with him


kinklock:

i will honestly never be over the fact they have both Sherlock and John shaving for each other in the season where they both have girlfriends like what a fucking beard joke unbelievable 



jupitusmercury:

“Don’t tell me it ‘arrests the rise’…Don’t do that to my face!”

jupitusmercury:

Don’t tell me it ‘arrests the rise’…Don’t do that to my face!


my-nail-beds-suck:

i’m watching this week’s gbbo (late af i know shushh) and oh my GOD this CAKE

image

this cake is ME. I AM THIS CAKE. yes maybe i’d like to be a pretty pastel princess cake that’s ever so sweet and fluffy on the inside but let’s face it IF I WERE A CAKE I’D BE NANCY’S OVER-LEAVENED RUM-SOAKED FRUITY TROPICAL HOLIDAY IN HELL, FALLING APART UNDER THE WEIGHT OF THE DECORATIONS SHE HOPED MIGHT CONCEAL ITS TRUE NATURE but also i do taste so fucking fresh n delicious if u can get past that messy exterior hmmmmmm

i need a drink ahh


bartlettsabridged:

Kentucky Fitz: I couldn’t see his face or her face. All the lights went out one by one. And then there was a terrible hum. Then out of the darkness, it came for me. It spit something, and then a swarm of bees attacked. I tried to get a good look at it, but the bees were already stinging my eyes.

Ned: That’s terrifying. That’s TERRIFYING.

(Pushing Daisies, Season 2 Episode 1, Bzzzzzzzzz!)


commanderspock:

backstoryradio

Lantern slides showing movie theater etiquette and announcements, circa 1912.

All images via Library of Congress.

Why don’t the cinemas just save tons of money and re-use these?



paxvictoriana:


Scottish Art of the 19th-Century: Sir James Guthrie (Margaret) Helen Sowerby (1882) [National Galleries Scotland]

A group of Scottish painters in the late-19th century — who became known as ‘The Glasgow boys' — took from contemporary artists both within and outside Britain in order to shift the focus of their works to rural, familiar subjects. Looking especially to French Impressionism and, through them, to Eastern (especially Japanese) ink prints, the Boys wanted to ‘challenge the formulaic landscapes and narrative subjects of late Victorian Scottish painting, and to develop a distinctive style of naturalist painting' [University of Glasgow].
Of these, Sir James Guthrie (1859-1930) was a major player. Guthrie’s ‘early works of rural subjects painted with broad square brush strokes show the strong influence of French painters such as Bastien-Lepage. Guthrie was born in Greenock and trained as a lawyer before turning to art. After brief but stimulating periods in London and Paris, he committed himself to painting directly from nature in Scotland. Guthrie also experimented with pastel drawings and established a reputation as a successful portrait painter. He became president of the Royal Scottish Academy in 1902 and was knighted the following year’ [x].
As the Edinburgh Museums explain:

Inspired by the Dutch and French schools and artists like James A. McNeil Whistler, the Glasgow boys produced their most notable works between the 1890’s and 1910. Showing an interest in realism, impressionism and inspired by compositional techniques, the Glasgow Boys tried to challenge the Edinburgh dominated art scene.In the years prior to the outbreak of war in 1914, Glasgow was part of a great artistic evolution.  The Glasgow School or Glasgow Boys as they are known paved the way for a new ‘modern’ style of painting that swept Europe and America.  From the 1880’s the Glasgow Boys were exhibiting their works in the Salon in Paris.  The Glasgow Boys consisted of an informal association of some twenty artists; its main figures were William York Macgregor, Joseph Crawhall, George Henry, Edward Atkinson Hornel, Sir John Lavery and Arthur Melville. Many members of this Glasgow collective went to France to study in Paris or in the rural artists’ colonies in France. The paintings done by many of the group during the 1880s was among their most radical. Their compositions showed a particular interest in rural realism, in working out-of-doors, and in French-inspired tonal and compositional techniques. [x]

paxvictoriana:

Scottish Art of the 19th-Century: Sir James Guthrie (Margaret) Helen Sowerby (1882) [National Galleries Scotland]

A group of Scottish painters in the late-19th century — who became known as ‘The Glasgow boys' — took from contemporary artists both within and outside Britain in order to shift the focus of their works to rural, familiar subjects. Looking especially to French Impressionism and, through them, to Eastern (especially Japanese) ink prints, the Boys wanted to ‘challenge the formulaic landscapes and narrative subjects of late Victorian Scottish painting, and to develop a distinctive style of naturalist painting' [University of Glasgow].

Of these, Sir James Guthrie (1859-1930) was a major player. Guthrie’s ‘early works of rural subjects painted with broad square brush strokes show the strong influence of French painters such as Bastien-Lepage. Guthrie was born in Greenock and trained as a lawyer before turning to art. After brief but stimulating periods in London and Paris, he committed himself to painting directly from nature in Scotland. Guthrie also experimented with pastel drawings and established a reputation as a successful portrait painter. He became president of the Royal Scottish Academy in 1902 and was knighted the following year’ [x].

As the Edinburgh Museums explain:

Inspired by the Dutch and French schools and artists like James A. McNeil Whistler, the Glasgow boys produced their most notable works between the 1890’s and 1910. Showing an interest in realism, impressionism and inspired by compositional techniques, the Glasgow Boys tried to challenge the Edinburgh dominated art scene.

In the years prior to the outbreak of war in 1914, Glasgow was part of a great artistic evolutionThe Glasgow School or Glasgow Boys as they are known paved the way for a new ‘modern’ style of painting that swept Europe and America.  From the 1880’s the Glasgow Boys were exhibiting their works in the Salon in Paris.  The Glasgow Boys consisted of an informal association of some twenty artists; its main figures were William York Macgregor, Joseph Crawhall, George Henry, Edward Atkinson Hornel, Sir John Lavery and Arthur Melville. Many members of this Glasgow collective went to France to study in Paris or in the rural artists’ colonies in France. The paintings done by many of the group during the 1880s was among their most radical. Their compositions showed a particular interest in rural realism, in working out-of-doors, and in French-inspired tonal and compositional techniques. [x]