Rattigan Glumphoboo





anslogarrick:

get to know me: favourite book, film, score

atonement (ian mcewan, 2001; joe wright, 2007)

She was still a child, Robbie thought, not beyond confessing or blurting out that she had read his note, which in turn could lead her to describe what she had interrupted. He was watching her closely as she played for time, taking her napkin, dabbing her lips, but he felt no particular dread. If it had to, let it happen. However appalling, the dinner would not last forever, and he would find a way to be with Cecilia again that night, and together they would confront the extraordinary new fact in their lives - their changed lives - and resume.


nyworldsfaircollections:

Countdown to Opening Day, 1939 World’s Fair
Artwork by Albert Staehle (1899 - 1974). Handbill in the Collection on the 1939/1940 New York World’s Fair at the Museum of the City of New York.
The Fair Opened on April 30th, 1939, and was promoted via many beautiful posters and design renderings. 

'It made his heart ache to look around the vast expanse of the fairground that, not very long ago, had swarmed with flags and women's hats and people being whizzed around in jitneys, and see only a vista of mud and tarpaulins and blowing newspaper, broken up here and there by the spindly stump of a capped stanchion, a fire hydrant, or the bare trees that flanked the empty avenues and promenades. The candy-colored pavilions and exhibit halls, fitted out with Saturn rings, lightning bolts, shark's fins, golden grilles, and honeycombs, the Italian pavilion with its entire facade dissolving in a perpetual cascade of water, the gigantic cash register, the austere and sinuous temples of the Detroit gods, the fountains, the pylons and sundials, the statues of George Washington and Freedom of Speech and Truth Showing the Way to Freedom had been peeled, stripped, prized apart, knocked down, bulldozed into piles, loaded onto truck beds, dumped into barges, towed out past the mouth of the harbor, and sent to the bottom of the sea. It made him sad, not because he saw some instructive allegory or harsh sermon on the vanity of all human hopes and utopian imaginings in this translation of a  bright summer dream into an immense mud puddle freezing over at the end of a September afternoon — he was too young to have such inklings — but because he had so loved the Fair, and seeing it this way, he felt in his heart what he had known all along, that, like childhood, the Fair was over, and he would never be able to visit again.' 
—Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay

nyworldsfaircollections:

Countdown to Opening Day, 1939 World’s Fair

Artwork by Albert Staehle (1899 - 1974). Handbill in the Collection on the 1939/1940 New York World’s Fair at the Museum of the City of New York.

The Fair Opened on April 30th, 1939, and was promoted via many beautiful posters and design renderings

'It made his heart ache to look around the vast expanse of the fairground that, not very long ago, had swarmed with flags and women's hats and people being whizzed around in jitneys, and see only a vista of mud and tarpaulins and blowing newspaper, broken up here and there by the spindly stump of a capped stanchion, a fire hydrant, or the bare trees that flanked the empty avenues and promenades. The candy-colored pavilions and exhibit halls, fitted out with Saturn rings, lightning bolts, shark's fins, golden grilles, and honeycombs, the Italian pavilion with its entire facade dissolving in a perpetual cascade of water, the gigantic cash register, the austere and sinuous temples of the Detroit gods, the fountains, the pylons and sundials, the statues of George Washington and Freedom of Speech and Truth Showing the Way to Freedom had been peeled, stripped, prized apart, knocked down, bulldozed into piles, loaded onto truck beds, dumped into barges, towed out past the mouth of the harbor, and sent to the bottom of the sea. It made him sad, not because he saw some instructive allegory or harsh sermon on the vanity of all human hopes and utopian imaginings in this translation of a  bright summer dream into an immense mud puddle freezing over at the end of a September afternoon — he was too young to have such inklings — but because he had so loved the Fair, and seeing it this way, he felt in his heart what he had known all along, that, like childhood, the Fair was over, and he would never be able to visit again.' 

—Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay



"I spent like 10 years of my life pretending to fly around on a broomstick and you’re asking me if preparing for a love scene was ‘tricky’ because the other person also had a penis?"
Daniel Radcliffe (via hankgreensmoustache)

comedycentral:

"You’re not supposed to eat Americone Dream after sex. You’re supposed to eat it during sex. That’s what the waffle cone pieces are for, they’re ribbed for your pleasure.” -Stephen Colbert



amandaabbington:

“Martin plays a good villain. He did a thing called Jump Mr Malinoff Jump, where he played this quiet psychopath. Yeah, he’s terrifying. Everyone does think he’s really Mr Nice Guy. And he’s not, he’s a fiend. You’ve got a scoop,” she said with a laugh. “‘Partner is evil.’” (x)

amandaabbington:

“Martin plays a good villain. He did a thing called Jump Mr Malinoff Jump, where he played this quiet psychopath. Yeah, he’s terrifying. Everyone does think he’s really Mr Nice Guy. And he’s not, he’s a fiend. You’ve got a scoop,” she said with a laugh. “‘Partner is evil.’” (x)




"His Majesty’s Navy had recently captured a French ship of the line with a very fine figurehead in the shape of a mermaid with bright blue eyes, coral-pink lips, a great mass of sumptuous golden curls artistically strewn with wooden representations of starfish and crabs, and a tail that was covered all over with silver-gilt as if it might be made of gingerbread inside. It was known that before it had been captured, the ship had been at Toulon, Cherbourg, Antwerp, Rotterdam and Genoa, and so the mermaid had seen a great deal of enemy defences and of the Emperor Napoleon Buonaparte’s great scheme of ship-building which was going forward at that time. Mr Horrocks asked Mr Norrell to put a spell on her so that she might tell all she knew. This Mr Norrell did. But though the mermaid could be made to speak she could not at first be brought to answer any questions. She considered herself the implacable enemy of the British and was highly delighted to be given powers of speech so that she could express her hatred of them. Having passed all her existence among sailors she knew a great many insults and bestowed them very readily on anyone who came near her in a voice that sounded like the creaking of masts and timbers in a high wind."
— Susanna Clarke - Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell (via chamyl)