Rattigan Glumphoboo


telltaleink:

Let’s play Burn Read Rewrite. 
It’s like Kill Fuck Marry, but with  books. 
Put three books in my ask. 


"Could you perhaps, um, sing -"
"Baa Baa Black Sheep like I’m very frightened?"


drinkmasturbatecry:

nudityandnerdery:

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

they need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay
“He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”
"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”
"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”
"It looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”
"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

And, of course: "The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t."

the one that will always stay with me is “Arthur Dent was grappling with his consciousness the way one grapples with a lost bar of soap in the bath,” i feel like that was the first time i really understood what you could do with words.

drinkmasturbatecry:

nudityandnerdery:

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

they need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay

He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”

"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”

"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”

"It looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”

"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

And, of course:

"The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t."

the one that will always stay with me is “Arthur Dent was grappling with his consciousness the way one grapples with a lost bar of soap in the bath,” i feel like that was the first time i really understood what you could do with words.


jfransherlocked:

miss-dramateen:

Scenes without background music; John Watson told Sherlock to “Stand Up Straight”.

Haha he did. Wtf

WAIT
I JUST HEARD SHERLOCK SAY ‘ASHTRAY’ (I knew he said ‘I know ash’ but this is the first time I heard this bit clearly):

WAS HE BRAGGING ABOUT HAVING STOLEN THAT ASHTRAY FROM BUCKINGHAM PALACE FOR JOHN?!

He totally was. He was on John’s stag night, telling strangers (maybe defending himself against men who mocked them for being two blokes out in a flashing-lights club? Or just drunkenly boasting?) that he takes care of John, has done weirder and more impressive things than this for John Watson: he once stole an ashtray from the Queen. (Ohalsowhilewe’reonthesubject d’youknow there are 242 kinds of ash that he knows from one another?)


shawskankredemption:

Bruce Banner’s first line is one of reassurance and calm and then he crouches down so he can be on the young girl’s level so he’s less intimidating and will be able to help GODDDD HELP ME I LOVE BRUCE BANNER HE IS A DARLING

Just when I start to think there are only superheroes who help save the stock market or the president or attractive young white women quivering at the top of buildings… then I remember Bruce Banner actually helping a very human problem — disease among the most vulnerable people, who most of the world conveniently forgets — and I just want to hug him.





I said, “The only way I can play someone this hard is for something to be peeled away each week, and the first thing that needs to go is the wig.” I just wanted to deal with her hair. It’s a big thing with African-American women…You start when you’re just a young girl. Do you twist it? Do you leave it natural when it’s so hard to take care of? Then you start wearing wigs but every night before bed you’ve got to take the wig off and deal with your hair underneath. And it’s a part of Annalise that I needed the writers to deal with because I’ve never seen it, ever, on TV and I thought it would be very powerful. It’s part of her mask. - Viola Davis (x)



beatonna:

If you enjoyed poking fun at genres with Femme Fatale, and if you like smart parody, give Nonsense Novels by Stephen Leacock a spin.  It’s one of my favourite humour collections of all time.  Leacock is perhaps not very well known outside his native land, but he is a grandfather of parody, among the best of them.  Nonsense Novels was first published in 1911, and takes on several literary tropes, the first - as you see here - is the Great Detective.  The link is to a nice pdf of the whole book.

beatonna:

If you enjoyed poking fun at genres with Femme Fatale, and if you like smart parody, give Nonsense Novels by Stephen Leacock a spin.  It’s one of my favourite humour collections of all time.  Leacock is perhaps not very well known outside his native land, but he is a grandfather of parody, among the best of them.  Nonsense Novels was first published in 1911, and takes on several literary tropes, the first - as you see here - is the Great Detective.  The link is to a nice pdf of the whole book.

posted 2 days ago via beatonna with 966 notes